Restoration continues inside and out; Wilton House and others

Wilton House, Wiltshire (Image: John Goodall/Geograph)

Wilton House, Wiltshire (Image: John Goodall/Geograph)

Any time of economic difficulties can often lead to any expenditure being put on hold, including vital restoration projects.  So it’s encouraging to see projects still being completed – but as some of these were approved and started back in the heady days of government largesse, perhaps these are the last we’ll see for a while except where private money can fill the gap?

One of the most impressive has been the award-winning restoration of the family dining room at Wilton House, Wiltshire – and maybe all the more impressive as it was funded privately by the owner, the 18th Earl of Pembroke.  Although ranked as joint 574th in the Sunday Times Rich List 2010, with an estimated worth of £115m, most of this wealth is tied up in the value of the house, the contents (including superb paintings by Van Dyck and Rembrandt), and the estate.

Anyone undertaking an architectural project at Wilton is following in some fairly illustrious footsteps.  The main house, one of the finest still in private hands, is unusual in that the scale of the house was a response to the incredible gardens designed by Issac de Caus in 1632.  The design is sometimes attributed to Inigo Jones but a drawing found by Howard Colvin at Worcester College by de Caus showed he was responsible for the original plan for a much larger, 21-bay palace, with a grand central portico, running to a total length of 330-ft.  However, the untimely death of the newly-married Earl in 1636 and the subsequent return of the huge £25,000 marriage dowry (approx £40m today) to the bride’s father, the Duke of Buckingham, meant that the scheme was now too ambitious and so just one half of the original design was built; which is what we see today. The half-a-house was considered plain so Jones became involved, adding the one-storey corner towers to the design.

Private dining room - Wilton House (Image: Historic Houses Association)

Private dining room - Wilton House (Image: Historic Houses Association)

Wilton’s interior, in particular the celebrated set of seven state rooms in the southern facade which includes the famous Double Cube room, were largely the creation of Jones, assisted by his able deputy John Webb.  Yet there are other fine rooms which had become misused over the years and one has now been restored in sumptuous style as a private dining room.  Formerly cluttered with the normal ephemera of family life – CDs, books, old furniture etc – it was  fairly sorry sight.  The current Earl and Countess of Pembroke have spent an undisclosed, but undoubtedly substantial, sum on creating a glorious dining room but which will sadly not be included on the tourist trail.  Tapestries now cover the deep green walls, interspersed with family portraits by Reynolds, completing what James Stourton, chairman of Sotheby’s UK described as “…one of the outstanding country house renovations of the decade.” and winning the 2010 HHA/Sotheby’s Restoration Award.

One of the largest of the recent projects has been the £5.6m restoration of grade-II listed Bedwellty House in Tredegar, south Wales.  Built in 1818 for the owner of the first iron works in Tredegar, it was increasingly at risk of falling into dereliction.  Realising the importance of the building, the local council spent four years securing grants to fund the ambitious programme from organisations such as the Heritage Lottery Fund, the Welsh Assembly, Blaenau Gwent council, and Cadw [Welsh equivalent to English Heritage] .  The works have included work on the ornate plaster ceilings, the sash windows and shutters, and the main structure.  Work will now continue on the parkland and gardens to bring them back to their former glory.

The grounds of our country houses were also not just a buffer to keep the world from intruding but also a stage on which to create idealised landscapes and views.  To this end they were often populated with follies or architectural creations to catch the eye of those looking out from the house but also those walking the grounds.  Sadly, the isolation of these buildings has often meant that in recent years they have been cut-off from the main house, forgotten, or neglected and vandalised.  Nowadays these wonderful architectural vignettes have been increasingly valued and urgent works undertaken to restore them.  One fine example is the grade-I listed Wentworth Castle Rotunda in Yorkshire.  Started in 1739 and finished in 1742, the design is based on the Temple of Vesta at Tivoli near Rome.  One of 26 listed buildings in the 500-acre parkland, the temple has now been restored following a grant of £300,000, which has enabled the removal of overgrowing shrubs, and the cleaning and repair of the stonework, roof, and floors.

Thankfully the official organisations don’t have a monopoly on generosity. Perhaps those selling a house in need of some restoration might take a lead from admirable seller of Newberry Hall, Ireland, Richard Robinson.  Realising that the elegant Palladian house with its wonderful flanking pavilions is in dire need of restoration, the elderly owner has put the house on the market but with the offer of a substantial contribution towards the costs of restoration to bring the house back to its former glory.  With such generosity, one hopes a suitably sympathetic buyer can be found who will be willing to take on the project and complete an appropriate restoration.

Restoration has always been expensive so in their straitened times we can only hope that funds for basic care and maintenance are found so that in a few years time we are not faced with a slew of houses and monuments suffering from any short-sighted desire to save a few pence today at the cost of many pounds tomorrow.  Long may the stories be of enhanced glories such as that at Wilton House rather than urgent appeals to save buildings at risk.

Full story: ‘Winner of Historic Houses Restoration Award 2010 Announced‘ [Art Daily]

Full story: ‘Tredegar’s Bedwellty House restoration work unveiled‘ [BBC News]

Full story: ‘Restoration of Wentworth Castle Rotunda completed‘ [BBC News]

Full story: ‘Rotunda is reopened to round of applause for works‘ [Yorkshire Post]

Full story: ‘Deal for buyer who will rescue Kildare demesne‘ [Irish Times]

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About Matthew Beckett - The Country Seat

An amateur architectural historian with a particular love of UK country houses in all their many varied and beautiful forms.
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6 Responses to Restoration continues inside and out; Wilton House and others

  1. Andrew says:

    The Newberry Hall sale link:
    http://www.raymondpotterton.com/property-for-sale/kildare/2906-newberry-hall-demesne-carbury-co-kildare/

    Please also note that in the Kildare Draft Development Plan (no Grade yet allocated to the house) it is spelt Newbury Hall.

  2. ldm says:

    The Chatsworth Masterplan is another quite ambitious project:

    http://www.chatsworth.org/the-chatsworth-masterplan

    Although it is stated to be a multi-phased project, the website has not been updated past the initial stage as best I can tell.

  3. Andrew says:

    Thanks for the link, Idm, especially the photos in the “Masterplan pictures” section. Chatsworth was probably not mentioned in this post because it was already covered in a March post:

    https://countryhouses.wordpress.com/2010/03/12/the-glory-that-is-chatsworth-house-today

  4. Andrew says:

    Wrest Park House and Gardens in Bedfordshire has an ongoing 20-year restoration Master Plan by English Heritage, since taking ownership of the listed buildings and most of the 150 acres in 2006 from the non-departmental public body BBSRC (Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council). English Heritage have in any case been responsible for the garden’s upkeep since 1986. Over £2m has already been spent on restoration, with the further £1m Italian & Rose Gardens and the house’s Sitting Room restorations to be completed by June 2011:
    http://www.english-heritage.org.uk/about/news/future-of-magnificent-garden-secured
    http://www.english-heritage.org.uk/book-and-buy/venue-hire/wrest-park
    English Heritage 20 year Master Plan for Wrest Park –
    http://www.centralbedfordshire.gov.uk/portal/showimage.asp?j=CB/10/01253&index=329840
    Further Wrest Park history –
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wrest_Park
    http://www.photographers-resource.co.uk/A_heritage/Houses/LG/Wrest_Park.htm

  5. Andrew says:

    Belmont House on Unst in the Shetland Islands, built in 1775, is the northernmost restoration of a country house in the British Isles, costing £1.2m over the last 6 years and being recently completed. It is available from April 2011 for holiday accommodation, weddings, corporate events, art exhibitions and music functions. It’s probably best to plan your visit during summer, unless you like cold weather!

  6. Andrew says:

    Hanbury Hall in Worcestershire, owned by the National Trust, had its 1710 Sir James Thornhill staircase wall paintings restoration awarded the 2010 Institute of Conservation (Icon) Pilgrim Trust Award for Conservation during a ceremony at the Royal Institution of Great Britain in London on 1 December. The £80,000 project was carried out by the Perry Lithgow Partnership, which involved cleaning the surface, consolidating cracks, repairing previous restoration work, restoring areas of flaking paint and preserving the paintings with a matt varnish coating.
    Staircase images – from the Hall, floor, stairs, landing and closeup.
    Thornhill also worked on another National Trust property, Wimpole Hall in Cambridgeshire, where he decorated the chapel in 1724. He also redesigned Moor Park in Hertfordshire in 1721, which is now a golf clubhouse.

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